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Idea Generator For Poems

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The “Idea Generator For Poems” is ​a brilliant ​tool designed to help poets spark ⁤their creativity‌ and overcome writer’s block. This innovative software generates a ‍myriad of ⁢unique and ​inspiring ideas that ⁢can serve as a starting point for creating beautiful and evocative poetry.

One of ‌the⁢ standout features of the “Idea Generator For Poems” is its vast database of prompts,‍ themes, and ‍images. It offers ⁢an extensive collection of thought-provoking words and phrases that poets can explore and develop. From nature ⁣and love to abstract concepts and emotions, the generator covers a wide range of thematic areas to suit various poetry styles and interests.

Additionally, the “Idea Generator ‌For Poems” incorporates ​various ‍techniques to trigger fresh ideas. It employs randomization algorithms to present unexpected combinations and juxtapositions that can ignite the poet’s imagination. This feature encourages ⁢unconventional thinking and helps poets break free from clichés and repetitive patterns ⁤in their work.

Furthermore, the ⁤generator offers ⁣users the ability to customize ⁣their⁤ preferences. Poets can specify the desired length or structure of the poem⁤ they wish to create. ⁢They can also select specific sub-categories within different themes, allowing for even more specific and ⁤tailored ‌idea⁣ generation.

For ease of use, the “Idea Generator For Poems” provides a user-friendly interface that enables poets to effortlessly navigate through the ⁢various features and options

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From a Pulitzer Prize–winning author, a brilliantly rendered life of one of our most admired American poets

Since her death in 1979, Elizabeth Bishop, who published only one hundred poems in her lifetime, has become one of America’s best-loved poets. And yet—painfully shy and living out of public view in Key West and Brazil, among other hideaways—she has never been seen so fully as a woman and an artist. Megan Marshall makes incisive and moving use of a newly discovered cache of Bishop’s letters—to her psychiatrist and to three of her lovers—to reveal a much darker childhood than has been known, a secret affair, and the last chapter of her passionate romance with the Brazilian modernist designer Lota de Macedo Soares.

These elements of Bishop’s life, along with her friendships with poets Marianne Moore and Robert Lowell, are brought to life with novelistic intensity. And by alternating the narrative line of biography with brief passages of memoir, Marshall, who studied with Bishop in her storied 1970s poetry workshop at Harvard, offers the reader a compelling glimpse of the ways poetry and biography, subject and biographer, are entwined.

Finally, in this riveting portrait of a life lived for—and saved by—art, Marshall captures the enduring magic of Bishop’s creative achievement. 

From the Publisher

Elizabeth Bishop in Brazil, 1955

Courtesy of Elizabeth Bishop Papers, Special Collections, Vassar College Library.

Megan Marshall, 1975, the summer after she first met Elizabeth Bishop

Courtesy of the author.

This photograph of Elizabeth Bishop, taken in 1955 while she lived in Brazil, was her favorite portrait. She was annoyed that the photographer skipped the country, taking the negatives with him, and she was never able to make more prints. When I began researching Elizabeth Bishop’s life, I started to sense some eerie connections, as often happens with biographers and their subjects. One was realizing that I had a photo of myself from the time that I knew her, in which I was posed in exactly the same way against a rock wall, wearing the same kind of blouse with the sleeves rolled up! At the time, I hadn’t seen her photograph, which had been taken twenty years earlier. There was no way I was consciously imitating her.

Although I took a writing workshop with Elizabeth Bishop at Harvard, where I was a scholarship student, I didn’t know her well at all. Her classes, called ‘Advanced Verse Writing,’ were quite structured and formal, and she was very shy, not comfortable holding forth or dispensing wisdom. Some of her students became her friends, but I wasn’t one of them. In fact there was a little problem between us that plays out in the brief autobiographical sections that alternate with the longer biographical chapters of the book.

How well do we know the people in our lives? How well can a biographer know her subject, relying only on primary documents and remembered accounts? The alternating chapters of Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast—biography followed by memoir followed by more biography—take on these questions indirectly. The reader sees Elizabeth Bishop as I knew her in real time, at the end of her life, alongside Elizabeth Bishop as she experienced her own life, going through it from birth to death.

One of the surprising results is that the reader gets closer to Elizabeth Bishop, experiencing her vicariously through my eyes. The essential mystery of what enables a person of genius to realize her talent is still there, but we see Elizabeth Bishop at first hand struggling to solve that problem. And it was a problem I struggled with too, how to make use of my own lesser capabilities and manage my fledgling ambitions as a student poet. We’ve all been there.

I learned so much from Miss Bishop, as we called her, that wasn’t on her syllabus, and that I’ve come to appreciate more powerfully since college and while writing this book. Miss Bishop taught by living her life, and so it seems natural that I would one day write her biography. Although lives aren’t pre-determined, they take their own course and may not really have a coherent shape, there was something miraculous about the reverberations in our lives, and a coincidence that seemed to bring us together at the end.

Objectivity is always a relative matter in biography—the writer is either sympathetic to or in disagreement with her subject, or she wouldn’t put in the time. In this book, the stakes are clear, which made the work fascinating and draws back the veil for readers.

—Megan Marshall.

Publisher ‏ : ‎ Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 1st edition (February 7, 2017)
Language ‏ : ‎ English
Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 384 pages
ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0544617304
ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0544617308
Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 1 pounds
Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 6 x 1.27 x 9 inches

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